OuterSpaces Charitable Trust

Te Kete o Te Kāhui

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He Kōrero mō Te Kete o Te Kāhui

The name for OuterSpaces Charitable Trust in Te Reo Māori is Te Kete o Te Kāhui, and was generously gifted to us from members of our community, as a collaboration between Kassie Hartendorp, Kabel Manga, and members of Tīwhanawhana.

Here is the explanation below.

Te Kete o Te Kāhui is about connectedness. In its full potential, it is a hub, a meeting ground; a place of joint work and support for the benefit of LGBTIQ young people in Te Whanganui-a-Tara. OuterSpaces in its English meaning, is about young people being 'out of this world', 'outstanding' and creating positive nurturing spaces, both physically and symbolically. In Te Ao Māori, Ranginui, the Sky-Father first began as dark, vast night. Different iwi have their own stories, but most believe that he was soon adorned with planets and stars, carried in sacred baskets and placed up in their new home. This was the creation of space as we know it, each constellation a source of light that has guided our tūpuna ever since.

To us, Te Kete is a sacred basket and the young people we work with, are the stars. Baskets are made up of many interconnecting strands and are associated with gathering, providing and nurturing. Our groups aim to feed and support young people as they find their place and identity in the world. Our projects provide useful tools and tips along the way when it comes to navigating sexuality and gender.

Te Kāhui is a group, a company, a constellation. Te Kete o Te Kāhui is made up of different projects that work towards the same vision – the universal respect for, and celebration of, sexuality, body and gender diversity. Our glow is brighter and reaches further, when we work together. Constellations are also a point of brightness, visibility and recognition and they have provided guidance and inspiration to people around the world since they first adorned the night sky.

Te Kete o Te Kāhui means young people are our stars, our taonga. What would the night sky look like without them? How do we support them to shine?

Edited 6 months ago